25 cooking conversation questions for ESL

50 cooking conversation questions

Cooking conversation questions

A handy speaking worksheet for any classes related to food. The difficult vocabulary on this printable includes – condiments, herbs, spices, recipe, burn, utensils, appliances, process, foreign, and ingredients.

There are also the kitchen utensils and kitchen appliances vocabulary worksheets to use in conjunction with this activity.

 

The cooking conversation questions are –

What things can you cook? What is your best dish?
What condiments, herbs, and spices do you like to cook with?
How often do you cook? Do you mostly cook breakfast, lunch, or dinner?
Do you like to watch cooking shows on TV? Which ones?
Has anyone taught you any recipes? Who taught you?
Do you ever cook for other people? Who do you cook for?
Have you ever burnt something in the kitchen?
Does your father know how to cook? What dishes can he make?
What cooking appliances and utensils are in your kitchen?
What is the best way to cook eggs? Describe the process.
What do you cook when you are feeling tired or lazy?
What was the last new recipe you tried to cook? Was it good?
How long does it usually take you to cook a meal?
Do you know how to bake or cook anything in an oven?
What kind of oil do you use for your cooking?
What accidents can happen when you are cooking?
Would you like to work as a chef? Why or why not?
Do you ever cook foreign food? From which country?
What is the worst thing you have ever cooked? Why was it so bad?
What foods do you think are very difficult to cook?
What soups can you cook? What are the ingredients?
Do you know how to cook on a barbecue or campfire?
Who cleans up after cooking in your home?
Who is the best chef you know?

Cooking conversation questions 2

The difficult terms on this second cooking discussion questions worksheet are – utensil, device, hand down, sauce, pickle, jam, hot plate, gas burner, turkey, sharpen, blunt, chopping board, and ingredients.

What are the 5 most useful things in your kitchen?
What cooking utensil or device would you like to buy next for your kitchen?
What food are you most likely to cook and take to a party?
Does your family have any special recipes that have been handed down?
What kinds of sauces, pickles, and jams are you able to make?
Do you think your cooking is healthy? Why do you say so?
Do you own any recipe books? How do you find recipes for new dishes?
At home, do you cook on an electric hot plate or a gas burner?
What is the best way to cook chicken? Describe how you like to cook it.
If you had your own personal chef, what dishes would you ask them to cook?
Have you ever had any cooking classes? What dishes did you learn?
Do you ever cook with friends? What types of food do you make?
If a friend cooked a terrible meal, how would you tell them it tasted?
Is cooking taught at schools in your country? Do you think it should be?
Do you own an oven? Is it big enough to fit a large turkey inside it?
What kinds of cooking creates the biggest mess in the kitchen?
Do you always wash your meat and vegetables before cooking them?
Is there any ingredient that you like that is hard to find where you live?
What are the best things to put in a salad? What do you use for dressing?
Do you know how to sharpen a blunt knife? What’s the best way to do it?
How many chopping boards do you own? What are they made of?
What is the last kitchen utensil that you had to throw away?
What kinds of food do you like to deep fry?
Can you think of a dish that you will never want to try cooking?

ingredients for healthy cooking
Cooking Idioms

Here are some interesting idioms to share with your students once you have completed one of the cooking conversation questions worksheets.

If a person boils over they get very angry and show it.

If you simmer down, you become calm and more relaxed after being angry.

A person who says they are cooking with gas means that things are going well and they’re having success with something they are doing.

Ideas that are half-baked have not been thought through very well and are very unlikely to be successful.

If you jump out of the frying pan and into the fire, you are moving from a bad situation to an even worse one.

A person who asks “What’s cooking?“, is simply asking what is happening or what are you doing?

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